Nashville’s Own featuring Sarah Peacock, Michelle Malone, Sarah Potenza and Granville Automatic in the Lounge - 6/24/19

Nashville’s Own featuring Sarah Peacock, Michelle Malone, Sarah Potenza and Granville Automatic in the Lounge - 6/24/19

Monday, June 24 2019 5:30pm Doors / 7:00pm Start / Ends 8:30pm (Estimated End Time)

Tickets

General Admission
$18.00
Mon Jun 24 2019

Nashville’s Own featuring Sarah Peacock, Michelle Malone, Sarah Potenza and Granville Automatic in the Lounge - 6/24/19

at City Winery The Lounge at City Winery

Doors:
5:30pm
Starts:
7:00pm
Ends:
8:30pm (Estimated End Time)

Tickets

General Admission
$18.00

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TICKETS ARE $18 IN ADVANCE, & $22 AT THE DOOR

Sarah Peacock

1.2 million miles, 2,800 shows, and fourteen years of flying solo is quite a road trip. Sarah Peacock bridges gaps between Country, Blues, Americana, and Rock-N-Roll. Her music is raw, truth telling, and fiercely unique.

Held hostage by her record label at 21, the troubadour life came with a rude awakening for the young Georgia native. Peacock made her home in a ‘92 Volvo with her dog and a guitar, and for nearly seven years earned a living in the corner shadows of American dive bars.

The tables turned in 2011 when an anonymous fan helped Peacock buy out of her recording contract. Since then, she has released six additional albums and won multiple awards for her songwriting. “Hurricane” won Best Song in the American Songwriting Awards, and “Beautiful” was a winner with International Unsigned Only. “The Cool Kids,” and “Are We There Yet” have nominated her for Best Female Artist and Best Song in a number of songwriting competitions. Peacock was also named Listening Room Network’s Artist of the Year.

In 2013, Peacock released her self-produced album, Albuquerque Sky, recorded in hotel rooms across the country while maintaining her rigorous 250 show tour schedule. Albuquerque Sky was followed by a season of goodbyes, tremendous growth, and challenges, and became the catalyst for her next album, Dream On (2016). “This record helped me get un-stuck. I had a collection of live recordings which became Dream On. After such a creative dry spell, I knew I needed to hit the road and stay out a while – reconnect with my fans,” says a determined Peacock. “I found this old silver eagle tour bus in Austin, TX. I was so enchanted with it, and the renovation process really reigniting my troubadour flame. So I bought my very first bus. Oh, what a feeling!” But less than 4 months later, she would watch it burn to the ground at a California truck stop.

One of Peacock’s fans voluntarily initiated a fundraiser, which is what kept her on the road. Another fan, so touched by her story, donated his motor home so that her tour could go on. That special connection between Sarah Peacock and her fans is what gives her the strength to continue overcoming. “You have to be unstoppable, even when you don’t believe you are.” That’s the modus operandi for the now half Tennessean, half Texan road warrior.

Sarah Peacock is active in the anti-bullying community, and her song, “The Cool Kids” has become a powerful anti-bullying anthem. Its message has taken on a life of its own. As she travels the country, Peacock shares her story in schools, empowering young people to embody her message of kindness and love.

Peacock is also an animal lover and tours with her pups as often as she can. Her late road dog, Gibson, was one of the first canines to receive a prosthetic mitral valve in a clinical trial at CSU in Ft. Collins, CO in May of 2017. Unfortunately, Gibson passed away. To honor his memory, Peacock recently formed her own 501(c)3, The Band Waggin,’ benefiting various animal health and rescue programs throughout the United States.

After completing two EP’s for Nashville label, American Roots Records, Peacock plans to release a full length album on her own label in 2019. Sarah Peacock is the truest definition of a self-made overcomer, hustler, and DIY machine. She’s got a remarkable knack for finding beauty in the ashes, and there’s no denying the future is looking bright for this tenacious up and comer.  

Website: https://www.sarahpeacockmusic.com/

Michelle Malone

"While the vocals and songs on Slings and Arrows are outstanding, the slide guitar work is the real revelation. ” - NO DEPRESSION

Michelle Malone's musical roots run deep and wide like the mighty Mississippi river, twisting and turning through rock, blues, and alt-country music territory. She is "a master at mixing blues and Americana music” (GUITAR PLAYER MAGAZINE). Over the course of Malone’s career, she has shared stages with artists from Gregg Allman to Indigo Girls, SugarLand's Kristian Bush to Brandi Carlisle, Mississippi All-Stars Luther Dickenson to ZZ Top, released more than a dozen records, and went indie when it still took guts. Her powerful live show will take you on a journey from red dirt back roads to bright city lights, whether she's solo acoustic in a living room concert or in a big arena backed by her band. She "has the soul of a bluesman, the heart of a folk singer, and the guts of a rock and roll star wrapped up in one fiery bad ass" (NASHVILLE RAGE), and she's determined to bring the masses back together in the name of love and music with her latest, Slings and Arrows.

Website: https://www.michellemalone.com/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7DSBED9Kv4



Sarah Potenza  

“I work for me,” Sarah Potenza declares at the beginning of Road to Rome, kicking off her second solo album — a record of self-empowered R&B, swaggering soul, and contemporary blues — with her own declaration of independence.

Filled with messages of self-worth, determination, and drive, Road to Rome shines new light on a songwriter whose career already includes multiple albums as front-woman of Sarah and the Tall Boys, a game-changing appearance on The Voice, and an acclaimed solo debut titled Monster. Released one year after she sang in front of 12 million people during The Voice‘s eighth season, 2016’s Monster prompted Rolling Stone to gush, “Potenza is to the blues what Adele is to pop: a colossal-voiced singer who merges her old-school influences with a modernistic sound.” Three years later, that sound deepens and intensifies with Road to Rome, an album that shows the full scope of Potenza’s aims and ambitions.

And just who is Sarah Potenza? She’s a songwriter. A bold, brassy singer. A businesswoman. A proud, loud-mouthed Italian-American from Providence, Rhode Island, with roots in Nashville and an audience that stretches across the Atlantic. Road to Rome spells it all out. Co-written by Potenza, produced by Jordan Brooke Hamlin (Indigo Girls, Lucy Wainwright Roche), and recorded with a female-heavy cast of collaborators, the album isn’t just her own story. It’s the story of all artists — particularly women, who remain the minority within the male-dominated music industry — who’ve learned to trust their instincts, refusing to let mainstream trends dilute their own artistic statements.

For Potenza, such lessons were learned during the writing sessions for Road to Rome, which took place aboard a cruise ship in the Caribbean, as well as at her home in East Nashville. It was during the cruise that she first began writing songs with Justin Wiseman, a piano player from Austin, TX. For years, she and her husband, Ian Crossman, had worked together as a duo, splitting their musical duties more or less equally, writing songs with guitar in hand, and merging their very different influences. This was something different, though — something about the piano that allowed Potenza the chance to rediscover her own voice, making an album whose unique approach to soul music was entirely her own. Although Crossman and Wiseman’s contributions as co-writers can be heard throughout Road to Rome‘s tracks, the album represents a strong shift in dynamic, with Potenza leading the charge.

When it came time to record Road to Rome at MOXE, Jordan Brooke Hamlin’s Nashville-area studio, Potenza looked to a wide range of musicians for influence. She turned to Whitney Houston. To Lauryn Hill. To Pops Staples, the Dirty Projectors, RL Burnside, Bette Midler, and more. Those artists gave her inspiration not only on a musical level, but on an emotional and thematic level, too. They were artists who spoke with conviction, chasing their own muses into unique, personalized territory. Potenza did the same, turning Road to Rome into an album filled with everything from the torch song balladry of “Earthquake” (a love letter to Crossman, thanking him for years of support ) to the funky fire of “Dickerson and Queen” (where Potenza howls, swoons, and croons over bass grooves and swirling organ, reminding everyone that, “I don’t give a fuck about nothing but the music”). She even makes room for a piano-propelled cover of “Worthy,” originally written by Grammy-nominated icon Mary Gauthier, who personally sent the song to Potenza.

Released on International Women’s Day 2019, Road to Rome is the sound of a songwriter taking the wheel and driving toward her own destination. This is Sarah Potenza’s strongest album to date: a battlecry from a soul singer and blues belter, shot through with pop melodies and rock & roll attitude.

Website: https://sarahpotenza.net/

Granville Automatic  

Led by a modern-day Linda Ronstadt, Granville Automatic writes songs the Associated Press calls “haunting tales of sorrow and perseverance.” With influences as diverse as The Smiths, Emmylou Harris, Simon & Garfunkel and Dawes, Granville Automatic has created a one-of-a-kind sound that revolves around their passion for storytelling. The duo, comprised of Nashville songwriters Vanessa Olivarez and Elizabeth Elkins, is named after a 19th-century typewriter.

The girls’ devotion to the project has proved a chaotic road of back-breaking touring, interpersonal tension, former-day-job balancing, other-band leaving, and a love-hate dynamic that brought them from Atlanta to Nashville. Theirs is a creative partnership reminiscent of Lennon-McCartney, a dreamer-doer, accessible-obtuse, country-rock collision of two polar opposites. What the two share, however, is a love for nostalgia: old records and antiques, tarot cards and dusty books, ghosts on battlefields

and lost stories from the past. That common ground has produced four historically-minded albums widely praised from The New York Times to an Editor’s Pick in No Depression.

Recently, the band has released a series of non-history-related singles, beginning with “A Little of Both” – an anthem for girls who really want it all. The singles have more than 750,000 streams to date, and have been featured on Apple Music's Hot Country Tracks and Pandora's New Country.

Granville Automatic’s new album is Radio Hymns, a 13-track concept record mining Nashville’s lost history from the two wives of city founder Timothy Demonbreun to the day in 1974 that the Ryman Auditorium was saved from the wrecking ball. The album features guest appearances from Jim Lauderdale, Kevin Griffin of Better Than Ezra, Ben Fields and Matraca Berg. Elkins and Olivarez self-produced the record, using some longtime Granville players and some of Nashville’s legendary studio musicians (and studios). The album rocks and rolls, haunts and soars, and pays true homage to the mystery of Music City. The album has been featured in USA Today, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Bitter Southerner, The Tennessean, No Depression, American Songwriter

and many more.

“Stories always find their way to us,” Olivarez explained. “For our last album about the Civil War, those stories were usually very sad ones about love and loss. But for Nashville – we kept discovering stories of deception, murder, trickery, drugs and debauchery. It’s a very different beast, but one often with redemption at the end of the road.”

“This is my favorite recording project I’ve ever done,” added Elkins. “The stories are insanely intense – and really reveal the character and heart and depth of Nashville’s past. Much like Music Row has its secrets, the city is full of incredible stories of affairs, God, war, love and ghosts. We spent hours looking for the greatest stories, many long buried as the houses or streets where they happened have vanished. I

think we found some good ones. “As writers in Nashville, we often write for the radio with hopes to make a living. But we came here because songs are our hymns – they save us. That’s why we called this RADIO HYMNS,” the girls agreed.

Elkins and Olivarez have written songs recorded by country stars Billy Currington (the Billboard Country Top 30 single “Drinkin’ Town With A Football Problem”), Sugarland, Kira Isabella (the Billboard Canadian Country Top 15 hit “Little Girl”), Aaron Goodvin, Wanda Jackson, Angaleena Presley and numerous others. Their songwriting led them to a coveted Composers in Residence spot at Seaside, Fla.’s Escape to Create program. They’ve appeared on DittyTV, PBS’ Sun Studio Sessions and WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour. You may have heard their songs on ABC’s American Crime and The Lying Game, as well as Netflix’s The Ranch. Their tour schedule is as frenzied as 150 shows a year, including stops at SXSW, the Key West, Island Hopper, Red River and 30A Songwriters festivals, CMA Fest and Tin Pan South. They’ve played at venues from the legendary Joshua Tree roadhouse Pappy & Harriet’s to Texas’ haunted Gruene Hall and have shared the stage with Gretchen Peters, Little Texas, Ty Herndon, Shenandoah, Radney Foster and The SteelDrivers.

Website: http://www.granvilleautomatic.com/