The Bluegrass Situation Presents: JAMuary in the Lounge featuring Molly Tuttle & Rachel Baiman - 1/15/19

The Bluegrass Situation Presents: JAMuary in the Lounge featuring Molly Tuttle & Rachel Baiman - 1/15/19

Tuesday, January 15 2019 5:30pm Doors / 7:00pm Start / Ends 8:30pm (Estimated End Time)

Tickets

General Admission
$10.00
Tue Jan 15 2019

The Bluegrass Situation Presents: JAMuary in the Lounge featuring Molly Tuttle & Rachel Baiman - 1/15/19

at City Winery The Lounge at City Winery

Doors:
5:30pm
Starts:
7:00pm
Ends:
8:30pm (Estimated End Time)

Tickets

General Admission
$10.00

only 13 left for this Event !

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TICKETS ARE $10 IN ADVANCE, & $15 AT THE DOOR

The Bluegrass Situation is your hub for everything roots music -- celebrating roots music, roots culture, and roots lifestyle through editorial, curation, and marketing. BGS creates and covers content across every level of the international scene, ranging from timeless bluegrass to modern Americana, while also presenting and facilitating world-class showcases, festival stages, and musical events of all persuasions and promoting the best artists, events, and brands for hundreds of thousands of roots-minded fans and consumers around the globe. BGS: Roots culture redefined.

www.thebluegrassituation.com



MOLLY TUTTLE

Molly Tuttle speaks softly. Her voice is both lilting and lucid, and when she says that she wants to create music that is truly original and unmistakably hers, her quietness shifts into a steely audacity that’s charming and almost funny––she’s only 25, after all. But then, you remember her songs and her playing. And it hits you: brash, beautiful originality is exactly what Molly is doing.

The 2017 release of her debut EP Rise further introduced Molly to a roots music audience who had already enthusiastically embraced and elevated her. Her 2017 and 2018 wins for Guitar Player of the Year from the International Bluegrass Association (IBMA) were history-making, as the first woman to be nominated for the honor, and the accolades have kept coming in 2018 with Folk Alliance International’s International Folk Music Awards awarded her Song of the Year for her song “You Didn’t Call My Name” and being named Instrumentalist of the Year by the Americana Music Association. 2018 has seen Tuttle performing for enthusiastic audiences on such prestigious stages as as Celtic Connections, Mariposa Folk Festival, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival, Americana Music Festival, Philadelphia Folk Festival and many more as well as dozens of sold-out headline performances.

With all of this recognition, it might be easy to forget that Tuttle has yet to release a full-length album. In between tours, she has been hard at work in the studio crafting her eagerly-anticipated debut album with producer/engineer Ryan Hewitt (Avett Brothers, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Lumineers), which will be released in early 2019 on Compass Records.

“Her songs, singing and solos, much like her demeanor, tend to have an inward-looking elegance to them; they’re the outward expressions of a searching mind and a longtime dedication to cultivating her craft”

           - Jewly Hight, NPR

“Among the most brilliant guitarists in this new generation is Molly Tuttle, who seems as effortlessly conversant when flatpicking as when playing in the clawhammer style, and who is equally gifted as a singer-songwriter.”

    -Premier Guitar

“Molly Tuttle Will Reign Over the Americana Genre”

    -The Boot

“On her solo debut, an EP titled RISE, her playing is rhythmically complex, technically precise, and remarkably fleet, as though there are two sets of hands running up and down the frets, yet the guitar remains secondary to her evocative songwriting.”

     -The Bluegrass Situation

“[Molly Tuttle] sings with the gentle authority of Gillian Welch, yet plays astoundingly fleet flat-picking guitar like Chet Atkins on superdrive."

    - American Songwriter Magazine



RACHEL BAIMAN

In many ways, Shame, the new album from 27-year-old Nashville Americana songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Rachel Baiman, is an exploration of growing up female in America. “I wasn't necessarily trying to write songs that would be easy to listen to," Baiman says of the project, “I wanted to write about reality, in all of it's terror and beauty.” From the title track about abortion politics, to love, sex, and abuse in relationships, to classism and inequality in her re-write of Andy Irvine's working class anthem “Never Tire of the Road,” the album is ambitious in its scope, yet remains cohesive through Baiman's personal perspective. Despite the serious subject matter, the overall feeling of the album remains light, with the tongue-in-cheek “Getting Ready to Start (Getting Ready)” and feel-good anthem “Let them Go To Heaven." A departure from her stripped-down work with progressive folk duo 10 String Symphony, Shame is lush and varied in instrumentation and musical texture.

Inspired in equal parts by John Hartford and Courtney Barnett, Baiman's influences span a wide range, but years spent playing traditional music shine through in the album’s firmly rooted sound. For recording and production, Baiman turned to the talents of Mandolin Orange's Andrew Marlin. “At the time that I was writing the music for this record, I was listening to all North Carolina-made albums, including Mandolin Orangeand the album Andrew produced for Josh Oliver (Oliver is also featured heavily on Shame)." Shortly after reaching out to Marlin, Baiman traveled to Chapel Hill, NC for three intensive days in the studio. "The energy was amazing," Baiman says. "It became clear that we were making something really special that needed to be finished.”

Added to the musical intensity was the context of the material they were recording—namely, how the songwriting on Shame sits within the current American political climate. "I think what is happening in the country right now has really shifted my career priorities, and brought the folk music community together. We are all suddenly seeing our purpose come into focus, and feeling a renewed responsibility to be a voice of unity and resistance.” In addition to the release of her new solo album, Baiman is the co-founder of a new political group called Folk Fights Back, a musician-led national organization that puts together benefit concerts and awareness events in response to the Trump administration.

Baiman is no newcomer to activism. Raised in Chicago by a radical economist and a social worker, she was surrounded by social justice issues her entire life. “If I wanted to rebel against my parents I could have become a finance banker or a corporate lawyer” she says of her childhood. While her classmates went to church or temple on Sunday mornings, Baiman attended the Ethical Humanist Society of Greater Chicago, a non-religious community formed around discussions of morality and current events. “That was always a tough one to explain at school” she says with a laugh.


As a teenager, Baiman found music to be a welcome escape from worrying about global politics. “I often found the constant discussion of seemingly unsolvable problems to be intense and overwhelming, and when I moved to Nashville to pursue music it felt like something positive, beautiful and productive that I could put into the world. Now that I've had some years to devote to music,”—Baiman has been recording and touring internationally for the past 4 years with 10 String Symphony, and has played fiddle for numerous other artists including Kacey Musgraves and Winnipeg folk band Oh My Darling—“I find it hard to escape from the values that I grew up with, and I feel compelled to write politically, to speak out about things that I've experienced or seen. Songwriting is a unique opportunity to do that, because it avails a more emotional vehicle for discussion. I love the political tradition of folk music, from Woody Guthrie to Tupac, and my hope is that this record adds another voice to it.”