City Winery presents the Second Annual Nashville Harvest Festival + City Winery Nashville 5 Year Anniversary! VIP Ticket SOLD OUT! General Admission Still Available! - 10/6/19

City Winery presents the Second Annual Nashville Harvest Festival + City Winery Nashville 5 Year Anniversary! VIP Ticket SOLD OUT! General Admission Still Available! - 10/6/19

Sunday, October 06 2019 12:00pm Doors / / Ends 6:00pm

Tickets

General Admission
$65.00
Sun Oct 06 2019

City Winery presents the Second Annual Nashville Harvest Festival + City Winery Nashville 5 Year Anniversary! VIP Ticket SOLD OUT! General Admission Still Available! - 10/6/19

at City Winery Nashville

Doors:
12:00pm
Ends:
6:00pm

Tickets

General Admission
$65.00

 

GENERAL ADMISSION STILL AVAILABLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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VIP Tickets has sold out but you can still purchase tickets HERE.

 

City Winery is proud to present our second annual Nashville Harvest Festival! Enjoy an exciting lineup of live music (artists coming soon!), unlimited tastings of 50+ different wines and exclusive City Winery house-made wines, delicious food & so much more! Our Pie Town neighbors Tennessee Brew Works and Proper Sake Co. will be on-site serving samples, too!

For more information, visit nashvilleharvestfestival.com

We’ll be closing down our entire outdoor space to feature a live music stage, wine tastings, wine pong & more. Guests will be able to meet and chat with our Local Winemaker Robert Kowall, enjoy tours of our fully-functioning urban winery, and try award-winning wines from all over the world!


Tickets on sale Monday, July 15 at 3PM CT and available for sale only through City WInery Nashville. First 200 tickets are $35. Tickets are then $40 in advance, $45 after August 31, $50 day-of the event.

VIP Tickets are $65 and include access to indoor/outdoor private lounge area, additional specialty wines, and exclusive food options! Executive Chef Chris Allen will be serving cheese & charcuterie, plus a special light bite menu. The private lounge area includes a dedicated sommelier and unlimited tastings of higher-end wines exclusive to VIP ticket holders. VIP Tickets are $75 day-of the event.


This event is rain or shine, and some activities may be moved indoors if necessary. Full bar available. Wine tastings provided by our friends at Lipman Brothers.


For more information, visit nashvilleharvestfestival.com

 

60th Anniversary Year Kickoff Show

As part of the 2nd Annual City Winery Nashville Harvest Fest 

 

Featuring 

The Queen of Southern Soul

Candi Staton

 

Along with the all New Muscle Shoals FAME Gang 

Peter Levin (Gregg Allman Band, Amanda Shires)

Steve Ray Ladson (Robert Randolph family Band)

Austin Moore (Blind Boys of Alabama)

James LeBlanc (Legendary Muscle Shoals session guitarist/songwriter)

The Alabama Horns

The Shoals Sisters

 



Dumpstaphunk

 

Dumpstaphunk stands out among New Orleans' best as one of the funkiest bands to ever arise from the Crescent City. Born on the Jazz & Heritage Festival stage, and descended from Neville family bloodlines, these soldiers of funk ignite a deep, gritty groove that dares listeners not to move. Their performances combine ingenious musicianship and complex funk and jazz arrangements with soulful melodies that are simple enough for anyone to enjoy. In Big Easy tradition, dueling baselines from Tony Hall and Nick Daniels III set off one of the dirtiest rhythm sections on the planet, while Ivan Neville lights up the Hammond B3 keys and cousin Ian Neville's funky guitar riffs send the groove into overdrive. The band recently welcomed their newest member, Alvin Ford Jr. to the quintet, a New Orleans born and raised powerhouse drummer. Dumpstaphunk tosses around lead vocals and four-part harmonies the way Sly & the Family Stone did, but with three studio albums under their belt, Dumpstaphunk stands on the merit of their own material. Songs like "Dancin' To The Truth" off their latest record, Dirty Word (July 30, 2013, Louisiana Red Hot Records), offer an escape into the funky sublime, sharing the true spirit of New Orleans with every note.

 

"I don't expect to hear anything funkier this year." - Jon Pareles, New York Times

 

"[A] jackpot of a funk record from Dumpstaphunk." - WNYC

 

"Dumpstaphunk's self-produced sonic approach feels live, nasty, and greasy. The band's writing celebrates community, self-reliance, and social responsibility." - iTunes

 

"Dumpstaphunk's 'If I'm In Luck' brings the bass... boasts a fiery lead vocal from drummer Nikki Glaspie" - USA Today

 

"Funksters and those who relish solid musicianship and incredible vocal harmonies can just be glad that an album like Dirty Word is still being made -- that the 'one nation under a groove' remains vital. It's a head noddin,' booty shakin' disc..." - Louisiana Weekly

 

"If Dumpstaphunk was a 3 course meal it would start with a juicy rhythm section, then move on to a beautiful arrangement of guitars and keys, seasoned with some soulful vocals and add a pinch of Cosmic Slop for good measure." - Austin Chronicle

 

"Dirty Word offers a remarkably fresh update on a sometimes neglected genre." - Mix Magazine

 

"[Dirty Word] stands on its own as the harbinger of a new style of 21st century funk." - The Vinyl District

 

"Dumpstaphunk has grown from a small side project into one of New Orleans' most prestigious modern funk ensembles." - Rolling Stone




Ron Pope 

 

Nashville-based singer-songwriter, Ron Pope, has been navigating a sea change as of late. In the immediate aftermath of the birth of his first child, before he’d found his footing in this extraordinary new reality, a jarring incident left him contemplating his own mortality. After completely scrapping early recording sessions for the upcoming album Bone Structure (TBA, 2020), Pope set out on a new path, crafting incredibly candid songs directed squarely at his newborn daughter. Some songs speak to her directly and muse on the experience of fatherhood, while others reflect on a personal experience that has a lesson or a moral. Pope's 2017 release, the critically-claimed "Work" drew comparisons to Tom Petty and Bruce Springsteen, while also refusing to put him squarely into one category. Uncompromising and relentless, Pope has evolved into one of the top grossing independent acts in the business while garnering a legion of devoted fans the world over. Taking the industry-road-less-traveled and holding fiercely to his independence has proven fruitful for Pope; to date, he has sold out shows on three continents and in more than 20 countries, sold over 2 million digital tracks, had over 350 million streams on Spotify, 825 million plays on Pandora, 150 million views on Youtube, and has more generally crushed every metric used to measure what is possible for independent artists.



Nicole Atkins 

 

To borrow a phrase from heaven's new poet laureate, Leonard Cohen, Nicole Atkins was "born with the gift of a golden voice." But somewhere along the way she misplaced it. Goodnight Rhonda Lee is the story of Nicole finding her voice, and how, in doing so, she went a little crazy.

 

Great Art is born of struggle and Nicole was struggling. The problem was that she felt nothing. Her fans responded to her performances with the same fervor they always had, but Nicole felt nothing. Her new husband loved her and doted on her, but she felt nothing. She traced it back to her drinking and decided to try to learn to live without booze. But that first day of sobriety brought with it an unexpected additional test -- Nicole's dad was diagnosed with lung cancer. This Jersey girl, whose big voice was tethered to a big heart, and whose reaction to the mundane setbacks of everyday life had always been equally overblown, suddenly faced a real problem. "It toughened me up," she says.

 

And the songs started to come. Little bursts of therapeutic creativity. Thorny feelings transubstantiated into melodies. Beginning with "Listen Up," a wake-up call to a lucky girl who hadn't realized how lucky she'd been, Nicole started to find her redemption in these songs. They rang true in a way no songs ever had before. They came from a deep, vulnerable place. If Nicole had been living an unexamined life, she wasn't anymore.

 

She needed her newfound toughness though, as in the midst of all this turmoil, she prepared to move from her native Asbury Park to Nashville. Having spent more than a decade as the de facto queen of Asbury, Nicole was finally leaving the warm, but often stifling confines of her hometown. During one of her final nights before the exodus, a song came to her in a dream. “I Love Living Here Even When I Don’t” summed up the complicated feelings she experienced as she said goodbye to the only real home she'd ever known.

 

In Nashville, Nicole's once hectic life was very different. Left home alone as her tour manager husband plied his trade out on the road, Nicole found herself writing songs that examined "feelings of separation and being scared of new surroundings." In particular, the songs "Sleepwalking" and "Darkness Falls" echo like ghosts through an empty house.

 

Unsurprisingly, her sobriety faltered. She drifted in and out of it. Nicole knew the wagon was good for her, but she had a hard time staying focused on what was good for her. As it went on however, the clarity of those sober days started to shine through. And she was able to string them together in longer stretches. For the first time, she was able to offer a shoulder for others to lean on, rather than always being the one in need of a shoulder. It helped that she had to be strong for herself in order to be strong for her dad. Much of what she was feeling was painful, but it beat the hell out of feeling nothing.

 

She reconnected with her old friend Chris Isaak who encouraged her, in the midst of all the soul-searching and soul-baring, to write songs that emphasized the one trait that most sets her apart from the mere mortals of the industry, telling her, “Atkins, you have a very special thing in your voice that a lot of people can’t or don’t do. You need to stop shying away from that thing and let people hear it.” To that end, the two of them collaborated on Goodnight Rhonda Lee's standout track, the instant classic, "A Little Crazy.”

 

Great Art is a journey -- and Nicole Atkins traveled quite a distance to bring us Goodnight Rhonda Lee. As Nicole explains it, "This record came to me at a time of deep transition. Some days were good, some not so good. What I did gain, though, from starting to make some changes and going inward, and putting it out on the table, was a joy in what I do again. Joy in the process and a newfound confidence that I don’t think I've ever had until now. The album title, Goodnight Rhonda Lee, also came from those feelings. Rhonda Lee was kind of my alias for bad behavior, and it was time to put that persona to bed."

 

The direction in which these songs were headed was obvious. Nicole's voice had always recalled a classic vinyl collection. She is the heir to the legacy of "Roy Orbison, Lee Hazelwood, Sinatra, Aretha, Carole King, Candi Staton." She is untethered to decade or movement or the whim of the hipster elite.

 

In order to capture the timelessness she sought, Nicole enlisted a modern day Wrecking Crew: Niles City Sound in Fort Worth, TX, who had just risen to national acclaim as Leon Bridges' secret weapon. "We spoke the same language. We wanted to make something classic, something that had an atmosphere and a mood of romance and triumph and strength and soul." The album was recorded in five days, live to tape. The album that Nicole and the boys came up with in those five days, Goodnight Rhonda Lee, is nothing less than Great Art and a quantum leap forward for Nicole Atkins who, no matter how much she grows up, will always be a little crazy.